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The PASTA London project

 

Want to help provide London decision-makers with hard evidence on the benefits of walking and cycling, thus making the case for future investments? Want to make London a better place to live? The PASTA Project at Imperial College London wants to hear from you.

 

As witnessed by the recent Mayoral Election, transport is becoming an ever hotter topic in London, primarily because of the growing awareness of the capital’s poor air quality. The concentration levels of several air pollutants in London exceed EU legislative and World Health Organisation recommended limits, and scientists have concluded that nearly 9,500 Londoners die early each year due to long-term exposure to air pollution.

 

The PASTA Project is a major EU-funded research study that aims to show that how we travel in cities is not only an environmental issue, but also an issue strongly tied to health. The physical inactivity associated with urban lifestyles bring a major challenge to public health. We have an increasingly sedentary lifestyle – many of us sit for most of the day, and half of all trips shorter than 5 km are driven by car.

 

The UK’s Chief Medical Officers recommend that an average adult should spend at least 150 minutes a week on physical activity, defined as moderate-intensity activity that that raises your breathing rate (such as cycling or swimming). Two-thirds of the adult population in the EU do not reach this recommended level. Indeed, finding the time and to do so is not always easy.

 

This is where PASTA comes in – a rather entertaining research project acronym that stands for Physical Activity through Sustainable Transport Approaches. PASTA aims to connect transport and health by promoting walking and cycling as a way of integrating physical activity into our daily routines. In addition to being environmentally sustainable forms of transport, walking and cycling have great benefits for health: daily walking or cycling is an easy way for individuals to reach the recommended level of physical activity.

 

Seven European case-study cities are part of the PASTA project. The London case-study is based at the Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College London, by a team led by air pollution expert Dr Audrey de Nazelle. PASTA is aiming to recruit 14,000 participants across Europe to take part in an online survey and provide data on their travel habits and physical activity levels. 10,000 people have already responded.

 

In London, we are focusing specifically on East London and what the impact of the 2012 Olympics has been on sustainable travel in the four Olympic Boroughs (Newham, Hackney, Tower Hamlets and Waltham Forest). To ensure our research is informed and used by local decision-makers, and to engage with local communities, we have partnered with the London Borough of Newham on this project. We are also working with TfL, the GLA, the other three Olympic Boroughs and the London Legacy Development Corporation, with whom we will share our project data.

 

1500 Londoners have already taken part in PASTA!

 

Help us to reach our target of 2000 participants by October, and take our online travel survey today: https://survey.pastaproject.eu/london.

 

Everyone over 18 living or working in London is eligible to take part, regardless of how they currently commute. To thank participants for their time, there is a monthly prize draw of £100, and participants can also win rewards by referring your friends and family.

 

 

Our Future London: Happiness, Quality of Life, and Affordability in London

Find out more about this event here.

Our guest speakers for this event will be David Fell and Jennette Arnold OBE AM!

You can find David's draft provocation here.

 

David Fell

Director, Brook Lyndhurst LTD.

David Fell is a researcher, writer, presenter and activist in the field of sustainable economics. He is director and co-founder of the research and strategy consultancy Brook Lyndhurst; supports a range of not-for-profit organisations including Just Space and Smart CSOs; and blogs as EconEnough. His work – including his recent book “Bad Habits, Hard Choices” - is concerned, in particular, with the development of strategies for promoting changes in individual and institutional behaviour to bring about a more sustainable economy.

David has a degree in economics from Cambridge University; more than 25 years’ research and strategy experience for clients in the government, private and not-for-profit sectors; and he was a founding Commissioner on the London Sustainable Development Commission.

 

Jennette Arnold OBE AM

Member of the London Assembly representing LB Hackney, Islington and Waltham Forest

Jennette Arnold OBE AM has been a member of the London Assembly since 2000. Initially a London-wide member, since 2004 Jennette has represented the North East London constituency of Hackney, Islington and Waltham Forest.

Jennette’s work focuses on the key strategic issues that impact directly on the lives of her constituents including improved transport services, crime reduction and affordable housing. In 2010 Jennette was awarded the OBE in the Queen’s birthday honours list for her services to local government and the community of London.

She sits on as Chair of the Assembly’s Education panel and is also a member of London Assembly’s Environment and Health Committee and a patron of the British Caribbean Association as well as a keen supporter of Arsenal FC.

 

Sustainable City Awards 2015-16

This year London Sustainability Exchange were proud to partner with City of London to deliver the 15th annual Sustainable City Awards. Nicknamed the "Green Oscars", this event leads the way in terms of recognition of great, sustainable projects not only in London, but across the whole of the UK. After a thoroughly enjoyable awards ceremony presented by Alderman Dame Fiona Woolf DBE and Samantha Heath, CEO of LSx, we would like to congratulate ClientEarth - our overall winners - and each and every one of the winners, runners-up and highly commendable entries from all other categories. A special mention also to Siemens' The Crystal, which swept up 4 awards! Please do follow the links to find out more about the winning organisations.

Award Winners:

Sustainable Finance - WHEB Asset Management

WHEB Asset Management’s ‘FP WHEB Sustainability Fund’ is a public equity fund, which they invest exclusively in listed companies around the world that meet their definition of providing ‘Solutions to Sustainability Challenges'. This means that they invest in a unique combination of social and environmental themes including cleaner energy, education, environmental services, healthcare, resource efficiency, safety, sustainable transport, water management and well-being. 

Travel and Transport - London Borough of Waltham Forest

Waltham Forest was one of three Outer-London boroughs to secure £27 million ‘Mini-Holland’ funding. The project aims to dramatically improve cycling conditions by March 2018, and is one of the ways in which the Borough hopes to address the issues associated with traffic and congestion.

The Programme draws on international best practice and has been devised to support sustainable growth and regeneration, and improve quality of life for all who live, work and travel through the Borough.

The programme is aimed at encouraging modal shift from private cars to cycling and walking, through redesigning roadspace and creating new public spaces .

It is hoped that the investment will support a 10% mode share for cycling by 2020.

Responsible Waste Management - GENeco

GenEco’s main site in Bristol processes 35,000 tonnes of inedible food waste and 600,000 metres cubed of commercial liquid waste per annum, in addition to dealing with domestic sewage from over 1.1 million people in the surrounding area. All of these wastes contribute to biogas production and divert huge quantities of material from landfill or incineration.

In less than a year, GenEco have completed the design and build of the UK’s first commercial Gas to Grid supply of biomethane produced from food waste, commercial liquid waste and domestic sewage.

When operating at full capacity, the Gas to Grid plant is capable of producing enough enriched biomethane to supply 8,300 homes.

Resource Conservation - Siemens' The Crystal

The Crystal, built in 2012, contributes to resource conservation in a variety of ways.

Being an all-electric building, the Crystal operates at 70% less carbon emissions than comparable buildings. It is a zero-to-landfill building, in that all waste is either recycled or sent to a specialised plant to be burnt for energy.

Solar panels on the roof create roughly 20% of the building’s energy, while the rest is sourced from the London Array wind farm.

7km of ground-source heat pumps under the building mean that water can be heated without using any power at all, while thermal wheels are able to trap heat escaping from the building and redirect it into the building, further reducing heating costs.

The building also has a rain water harvesting system and grey water management plant, treating water that can then be used as drinking water and for WC flushing across the site.

Sustainable Buildings - Siemens' The Crystal

As well as all the innovative resource conservation technology that The Crystal incorporates, there are also a variety of other sustainable features included which make this a sustainable building.

It was the first building in the world to gain the highest ratings in both LEED (Platinum) and BREEAM (Outstanding); the world's two leading accreditation bodies for sustainable buildings.

The Crystal is equipped with a state-of-the-art Building Management System to intelligently monitor its own temperature and energy usage.

It also houses the world’s largest interactive exhibition on Urban Sustainability and the world’s most sustainable event space.

Together, they make up an establishment which not only set standards for green buildings of the future, but also educates the community and its visitors on the importance of sustainable technology in future cities.

Farsight Award - Deutsche Bank

Deutsche Bank’s research report -“The Logistics of Supply Chain Alpha”- has leveraged a unique dataset that provides over ten years of history on supply chain relationships, and explores predictive signals using information about a company’s upstream suppliers and downstream customers including stock returns, fundamentals, and number of linkages.

By following goods as they move through the supply chain, the authors find that stock selection signals based on supply chain data contain significant alpha.

Tackling Climate Change - Siemens' The Crystal 

The Crystal demonstrates some of Siemens technology that can contribute to sustainable city living, including a range of energy efficient features which contribute to tackling climate change.

Building Sustainable Communties - Age UK Lewisham and Southwark

Stones End Day Centre has been providing a day care support for older adults with care and support needs in a socially deprived area since 1984.

They assist around 80 older people every week by reducing their isolation and giving them the opportunity to meet their peers, take part in therapeutic activities and have a freshly cooked hot lunch.

Stones End Day Centre aims for its members to have a good quality of life and to be active for as long as possible, by creating opportunities for fun and stimulating days, in and out of the centre.

By offering a safe, caring and friendly place to come to, the volunteers at Stones End help prevent breakdown in caring relationships, as well as reduce hospital and residential care admissions.

Air Quality - ClientEarth

Client Earth uses the law to hold authorities all over Europe to account, ensuring they enforce environmental legislation that protects the public. Through their clean air project, they make sure everyone has the right to breathe clean air.

In April 2015, Client Earth won a 5 year legal battle against the UK government, over their ongoing failure to comply with EU limits for nitrogen dioxide which they should have met in 2010.

The Court ordered the government to take immediate action and draw up new air quality plans, to meet the limits as quickly as possible.

The Government’s plans cover not only the 16 zones in the legal case but also the other 22 areas still breaking air pollution legal limits.

Health and Wellbeing - Nomura

Nomura know that the good health of employees is vital if companies are to ensure that staff remain at peak productivity. This is why their new headquarters building at Angel Lane offers a wealth of facilities and services for the 3,600 staff that work there.

These include:

• four eating areas;

• a state of the art gym;

• private consultation rooms where employees can visit a nurse, doctor, dentist, counsellor or occupational health specialist;

• a bicycle bay (including a maintenance area, lockers and showers); and

• even a kitchen garden on the roof terrace.

When this is combined with regular health education and screening programmes, our judges felt that Nomura set a very high bar for other employers to emulate.

Sustainable Places - Siemens' The Crystal

Aside from the sustainable credentials of the building itself, the Crystal’s community activities also contribute to developing sustainability awareness within the local community.

The community garden, apart from supporting local bio-diversity, has also been used in their Urban Orchard project, whereby local families are invited to use the space to grow plants and herbs of their choice if they do not have a garden of their own.

They also work with local schools - recent childrens’ projects include an Up-Cycling Workshop.

On-site electric charging stations for 12 cars are provided and the Crystal café and event catering team source all ingredients within 10 miles of the building where possible.

The Crystal’s Exhibition of Urban Sustainability inspires its visitors to lead more sustainable lives and consciously engage with green issues. 

Sir Peter Parker - GENeco

GENeco are responsible for the marvellous BioBus. The bus, which can do 300km on a full tank, runs on food, sewage and commercial liquid wastes converted into biomethane. The widespread use of gas-powered vehicles also has the potential to significantly improve urban air quality, reducing harmful pollutants by 80-90%. This is an exciting concept indeed.

GENeco themselves have a successful track record for offering cost effective, sustainable solutions for their organic waste. They work to help their customers become more sustainable and reduce if not eliminate their dependence on landfill.

Overall Winner - ClientEarth  

Walthamstow's "Dragons Den" success before national competition

Walthamstow’s “Dragon’s Den” success before competing nationally this month!

Walthamstow’s “Dragon’s Den” success before competing nationally this month!
In 2015, LSx won a spot in the UK’s annual Test Town competition, a national competition where young entrepreneurs pitch their business plans in the hopes of winning £10,000 to fund their project. During the past few months, LSx has been working in partnership with Colin Crooks from Tree Shepherd to help young entrepreneurs in Walthamstow to develop their green business ideas and prepare for the competition. Their work recently culminated in a “Dragon’s Den” style event to decide which team would move on to the final part of the competition, which is taking place later this month. It was hosted by London Sustainability Exchange and judged by local business experts. Six teams went head to head for the chance to go through to the national competition:
Planttastic: The first team to pitch their idea was Planttastic from Sir George Monoux College. This vibrant group of individuals presented a “plant grower” made from brightly painted re-purposed pallets, for garden lovers with limited space. It was a sustainable and budget-friendly proposal that the judges felt was capable of “competing with a really good [garden] pot.”
VM Double S: VM Double S was the second team to present and their strong sense of partnership and good market research earned the judges’ admiration, as did their proposal for E-shelves, or “eco-stylish shelves.”
Forest and Found: Next up was Forest and Found, an already established business specialising in luxury woodwork and textile crafts. Its founders, Max and Abigail, impressed the judges with their experience, well thought out expansion plan, and emphasis on the back story behind their products.
Earth Tree Verse: Earth Tree Verse was the proposition of local artist and woodworker, Enrique. His business idea focused on giving new life to old wooden furniture and using locally-sourced materials such as the London plane tree to create beautiful, South Asian inspired chopping boards. 
Recypouch: The next idea came from a young entrepreneur who wished to sell stylish tablet pouches made from recycled materials. His drive and previous experience with start-up businesses caught the judges’ attention, with one of them offering to put him in contact with a local charity shop.
Hand Cultures: The final pitch came from a young duo that had developed the “Indie-Bowl,” a jewellery and accessory organiser made from recycled materials. The judges loved their innovation, and the team quickly became immersed in dialogue with the judges over the types of materials that could be used in their product.
After hearing all the pitches, the judges were left with the daunting task of choosing who would be able to go forward to the national competition. After much discussion, Forest and Found was chosen as the winner because of their strong current and future business plan. Congratulations, Max and Abigail! And thank you to everyone else who participated. Keep going with your businesses – we’re hoping to see your products in markets very soon!
Leah, Volunteer at London Sustainability Exchange 

Waltham Forest green enterprise winner bound for national competition

 

A ‘Dragon’s Den style’ panel of 5 business experts grilled Waltham Forest students and budding entrepreneurs on their 6 new business ideas this month. The winning ideas ranged from ipad cases to chopping boards that transform rubbish into desirable new products. 
The final of “TestTown Walthamstow” brought together local students from Waltham Forest College and George Monoux College, as well as local entrepreneurs. They presented an array of green business ideas to compete in the UK and Ireland's TestTown competition for 16-30 year olds.
The judges brought with them a raft of experience in business which ranged from the legal, finance, entrepreneurs (including a magician) and a business mentor.
This event was the culmination of activities which have taken place over the last few months managed by charity London Sustainability Exchange. In October participants had received green enterprise training from start up specialist Colin Crooks from Tree Shepherd. They worked on important aspects of business, such as identifying markets, considering materials source, cash flow and presenting. Throughout the process participants were given the opportunity to link with local mentors and market stalls.  
Winners on the day were:
1st prize - Max Bainbridge and Abigail Booth, aged 24, ‘Forest and Found’ http://www.forest-and-found.com/ re-using materials to create home wares
2nd prize - Ahmed Adow, aged 17, business student from Sir George Monoux College http://www.george-monoux.ac.uk/ with his idea for ‘Recypouch’ – ipad and tablet covers made from 100% recycled materials
3rd prize - Enrique Melin, aged 27, aspiring green entrepreneur ‘Earthsfreeverse’. Re-using wood to make kitchen chopping boards and up cycling furniture.  
The winning pitch will now go through to the TestTown Grand Final to compete for the £10,000 prize to start up their business. 
Samantha Heath, Chief Executive at LSx, said: “The workshop was a great success with some impressive ideas on the day. This project has complemented our wider Green Entrepreneurs programme; we are keen to work with as many people to be part of a strong green economy, especially after the success of the recent Paris Conference.”
Panel member Simon Fordham, Fordham Henderson Partnership said: “I was impressed by the quality, innovation and imagination that the young people showed in developing their sustainable product ideas. There were a few products that could ‘easily’ be released to the market and with the correct support have potential for success.”
Another panel member, Bora Kurti, Standard Chartered Bank, said: “TestTown is an encouraging initiative that discovers young local entrepreneurs. Candidates found their inner businessperson and delivered some great ideas. The dynamic individuals are on their way to help build a prosperous community.”
Winners Max Bainbridge and Abigail Booth, Forest and Found said: 'It was great to be challenged by the panel and made to think about what we have achieved with the business so far and how we can push ourselves to develop it further. We can't wait to take part in the final and seek out further opportunities to make our small business grow!'

A ‘Dragon’s Den style’ panel of 5 business experts grilled Waltham Forest students and budding entrepreneurs on their 6 new business ideas this month. The winning ideas ranged from ipad cases to chopping boards that transform rubbish into desirable new products. 

The final of “TestTown Walthamstow” brought together local students from Waltham Forest College and George Monoux College, as well as local entrepreneurs. They presented an array of green business ideas to compete in the UK and Ireland's TestTown competition for 16-30 year olds.

The judges brought with them a raft of experience in business which ranged from the legal, finance, entrepreneurs (including a magician) and a business mentor.

This event was the culmination of activities which have taken place over the last few months managed by charity London Sustainability Exchange. In October participants had received green enterprise training from start up specialist Colin Crooks from Tree Shepherd. They worked on important aspects of business, such as identifying markets, considering materials source, cash flow and presenting. Throughout the process participants were given the opportunity to link with local mentors and market stalls.  

Below: Dragons Den event winners, Max (left) and Abigail (right) featured with their products. 

Photo courtesy of OlliverPhotography.

 

Winners on the day were:

1st prize - Max Bainbridge and Abigail Booth, aged 24, ‘Forest and Found’ http://www.forest-and-found.com/ re-using materials to create home wares

2nd prize - Ahmed Adow, aged 17, business student from Sir George Monoux College http://www.george-monoux.ac.uk/ with his idea for ‘Recypouch’ – ipad and tablet covers made from 100% recycled materials

3rd prize - Enrique Melin, aged 27, aspiring green entrepreneur ‘Earthsfreeverse’. Re-using wood to make kitchen chopping boards and up cycling furniture.  

The winning pitch will now go through to the TestTown Grand Final to compete for the £10,000 prize to start up their business. 

Samantha Heath, Chief Executive at LSx, said: “The workshop was a great success with some impressive ideas on the day. This project has complemented our wider Green Entrepreneurs programme; we are keen to work with as many people to be part of a strong green economy, especially after the success of the recent Paris Conference.”

Panel member Simon Fordham, Fordham Henderson Partnership said: “I was impressed by the quality, innovation and imagination that the young people showed in developing their sustainable product ideas. There were a few products that could ‘easily’ be released to the market and with the correct support have potential for success.”

Another panel member, Bora Kurti, Standard Chartered Bank, said: “TestTown is an encouraging initiative that discovers young local entrepreneurs. Candidates found their inner businessperson and delivered some great ideas. The dynamic individuals are on their way to help build a prosperous community.”

Winners Max Bainbridge and Abigail Booth, Forest and Found said: 'It was great to be challenged by the panel and made to think about what we have achieved with the business so far and how we can push ourselves to develop it further. We can't wait to take part in the final and seek out further opportunities to make our small business grow!'

 

Below from behind: Dragons Den runners up, Enrique Melin and Ahmed Adow featured with their products. Below from left: Simon Fordham, Jake Banfield, Bora Kurti, Ed Hayden, and Daniel Clark.

Photo courtesy of jacobfnphotography.

 

For further information please contact:

Gemma George, London Sustainability Exchange, 0207 234 9400, G.George@lsx.org.uk (Project Lead)

www.lsx.org.uk @LSx_News

www.treeshepherd.org.uk @TreeShepherdUK

 

 

 

Practical Action! Volunteers tackle fuel poverty in their communities

Volunteers from the Muslim community took part in a practical training session with London Sustainability Exchange and MADE in Europe at the East London Mosque to learn how to tackle fuel poverty and retrofit homes using simple measures in a bid to tackle fuel poverty as part of the SIB funded Green Mosques project. 

With participants from Waltham Forest, Camden, Southwark and of course Tower Hamlets this day captured what the project was all about – volunteers coming together to gain skills and help out their community.

Volunteers learnt how to identify ‘leaky homes’ and how to retro simple DIY measures like make-shift double glazing using nothing more than cling-film and hairdryer, draught-busting door and windows and placing reflectors behind radiators to improve heat conduction. These simple measures (together with proper thermostat control) can save £100s of the annual energy bill.

One volunteer identified her grandmother’s house within walking distance of the Mosque as in need of draught busting.

Fuel poverty is defined as having to spend more than 10% of household income on the provision of a decent level of heating. 

Tower Hamlets, being one of London’s most deprived boroughs is home to 40% of the poorest communities in the UK despite having very high carbon emissions - 7.9 tonnes per capita, almost double the London average of 4.9 tonnes.

9% of London is said to be in fuel poverty where in more deprived areas, like Tower Hamlets, it is more than 11% and in Brent it is almost 20%.

Our day was not about focusing on the numbers or the negative, but motivating and moving people into helping themselves and other tackle this important issue.

East London Mosque, home MADE in Europe was our first stop. We plan to replicate the activities with Muslim Association of Nigerian UK (MANUK Mosque in Old Kent Road early December) and one other Mosque before winter is through.

Please contact b.hudson@lsx.org.uk for more information or visit www.lsx.org.uk

Test Town Walthamstow

LSx delivered Carnegie UK Trust's TestTown 2015 in Walthamstow.

Green Enterprise

Our current and previous programmes are geared to help communities and individuals to be more resilient. In some cases we have developed toolkits as part of the projects, please see links on the project pages or go to our resources section.

Smart Homes

The challenge

The UK has a legally binding target under the Climate Change Act 2008 to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. The Greater London Authority has stated that 36% of Greater London carbon dioxide emissions are produced by housing. A good part of this figure could be substantially reduced by implementing effective energy efficiency measures in London homes.

Aims

Smart Homes was created with a fund from the Department of Energy and Climate Change, the intention was to improve energy efficiency in London houses to deliver better, warmer and greener living spaces for communities whilst reducing carbon footprint. The project offered financial support for the implementation of energy efficiency measures in privately owned properties in six North London Boroughs: Haringey, Hackney, Islington, Camden, Enfield and Waltham Forest. Up to £6,000 was available for homeowners and landlords to implement energy efficiency measures in their homes.

 

 Key objectives:

  • Better: Homes are the central part of everyone’s life. They are where we live;
    raise our families and our place within the community. Improve the living conditions of our homes is a central aim for this project.
  • Warmer: energy bill represents a substantial amount of the annual expenditure of a family. The best way to protect families against rising costs of energy is to prevent heat losses from houses. Providing effective insulation measure in homes will effectively deliver reductions on energy bills.
  • Greener: Implementing energy saving measures in houses will bring not only financial and social benefits, it will also contribute to protect the environment from unnecessary carbon emissions and increase awareness on the environmental footprint of each household.

 

LSx worked with Haringey Council and more than 44 community groups to raise awareness and promote uptake of the opportunity. Read more about it here.

  

What we have achieved?

Using an effective 3 prong approach to access both virtual and actual social networks we worked with 44 community groups, reaching out to 371,728 people with:

  • 5934 being reached through events and drop-in sessions,
  • 28086 reached through newsletters and emails,
  • 6710 leaflets distributed and,
  • 280,388 reached through social media activities

 

“We’ve been pleased to assist LSx in promoting the Smart Homes grants to members of the community. It opened up a dialogue we wouldn’t normally have with our service users about energy efficiency and home improvements.”

Laura, Voluntary Action Walthamstow

 

“We are doing this because it is the right thing to do [insulate homes], not to make money”

 

Sylvia, Bushill Park Church

 

"It was great to work with London Sustainability Exchange to promote the Smart Homes initiative.  I enjoyed speaking to different community groups - especially those such as elderly or disabled who may not otherwise have known about such opportunities.  The support that project gives to vulnerable people is really important as people are faced with rising fuel costs.   We felt, as a local community centre, that it was important to engage with the issue and make sure the information reached those in our community who most needed it."

Susanna, Hornsey Vale Community Centre

 

We also reached out through appropriate professional networks; leaflets were distributed through 48 estate agents and the information was featured on numerous websites and newsletters. 

 

 Contact

For more information, please contact Hannah Gardiner on 020 2349 9400 or h.gardiner@lsx.org.uk

Green Entrepreneurs Waltham Forest

Six week course (1 day a week)

London Sustainability Exchange (LSx) is offering a fully funded six week course (one day a week) for community groups in Waltham Forest who want to start their own green enterprise. From up-cycling to recycling, this course is about making money from what would otherwise be waste. Whether you are just starting out, have an idea or want to develop one, this course is for you if you are from a community group in Waltham Forest and looking for extra income.

Alongside social enterprise start-up specialists, Tree Shepherd, this course will explore the key aspects of enterprise development, including marketing and finance. With additional support and workshops, we will help you build confidence, develop your idea and launch your enterprise.

To book your place or to find out more please contact Ben Hudson by email or phone him on 0207 234 9400

Or visit https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/GEWF

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London Sustainability Exchange is a registered charity, number 1122130, and a company limited by guarantee, registered in England and Wales, company number 5154010.

 

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